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Programme

Last modified Aug 5
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Welcome to the 1st Munich Legal Tech Summer School! We are happy you join us for a week of interdisciplinary exchange about Legal Tech, whether it is on- or offline. About half of our participants and speakers will be in Munich and the other half online. This programme does not only contain detailed information about the different sessions and the schedule, but, most importantly, also information on how we ensure the safety of everybody participating on-side in Munich. Therefore, please read the information carefully.

 

Online and Hybrid Participation

We will use Zoom to stream all sessions. For your convenience, we will use the same room for all sessions, if you have not yet received the link to the room, please contact us. You can also talk to us and each other using Slack, if you have not yet received the invitation link, please contact us.

 

Arrival in Munich and Hotel

If you participate on-site, you will arrive in Munich on the 1st of August. The summer school will take place at the Garching campus of the Technical University of Munich (TUM). The campus is located in the north of Munich and the largest campus of TUM, with more than 12,000 students in five departments. The campus has its own subway (U-Bahn) station called "Garching Forschungszentrum", which you can reach with the line U6 from the city center. From the airport, you can take the city train (S-Bahn) S8 until you pass Ismaning; from here Bus Nr. 230 until stop "Garching Forschungszentrum" on the Garching Campus. You can finde more information on how to find the campus here.

You stay in the newly opened "Courtyard by Marriott" located in the center of the campus (Walther-von-Dyck Str. 12, 85748 Garching, Germany). The hotel is located right behind the subway stations (number 1 on the map below). You can check-in from 3 p.m. Breakfast in the morning is included with your room.

 

(1: Hotel, 2: Location Monday, 3: Location other days, 4: Test center, 5: Canteen)

Hygiene Concept

In Bavaria, wearing an FFP2 mask is mandatory in public transport and most public indoor spaces, including the university. You have to wear an FFP2 mask at all time in all university building, even when you sit at your place. Other masks, like community masks or other medical masks, are not sufficiant. Please watch this video for more information. We will use the qronition (https://tum.qroniton.eu/) for contact tracing. If you are fully vaccinated, please bring a document to proof your vaccination status. In Germany, you are considered to be fully vaccinated from the 15th day after the second dose (or first dose for the vaccine from Johnson & Johnson).

Independent of your vaccination status, we ask you to get tested at least twice during the summer school, once on Monday and once on Wednesday. If you are a German resident, you can get tested for free at the test center on campus (number 4 on the map). For more information visit the website of the test center: https://schnelltest-studitum.de/. If you are not a German resident, we will provide you two self tests during the registration on Monday morning.

 

Schedule

(All times are UTC+2 and s.t. / sharp)

 

Monday (02.08.2021)

Time Event Place
08:30 - 09:00 Registration

Department of Informatics - Entrance area

(Number 2 on the map above; Boltzmannstr. 3)

09:00 - 09:15

Welcome

Prof. Dr. Florian Matthes

Department of Informatics - HS1

(Number 2 on the map above; Boltzmannstr. 3)

09:15 - 10:15

Introduction LegalTech & Natural Legal Language Processing (I)

Prof. Dr. Florian Matthes (TU Munich)

This talk gives an introduction to and overview of the field of LegalTech and its relevance in research and practice. After the introduction, we will focus on applications of Natural Language Processing in the legal domain. Legal knowledge is mostly encoded in written texts, like court decisions, laws, or commentaries. The ability to automatically process text is, therefore, key to automation in the legal domain. We will cover different rule-based and stochastic approaches and their applications to legal texts.

10:15 - 10:30 Coffee break
10:30 - 11:45

Introduction LegalTech & Natural Legal Language Processing (II)

Prof. Dr. Florian Matthes

12:00 - 13:00 Lunch break

Canteen (Mensa)

(Number 5 on the map above; Boltzmannstr. 19)

13:15 - 14:15

Lab: Natural Legal Language Processing (I)

Oleksandra Klymenko, Daniel Braun (TU Munich)

In the lab session, you will use open source libraries to apply the technologies introduced in the morning in interdisciplinary teams. We will provide real data sets and problems and guide you through the annotation and implementation process.

Department of Informatics - 00.13.008, 01.10.011,
01.11.018, 01.12.035

(Number 2 on the map above; Boltzmannstr. 3)

14:15 - 14:30

Coffee Break

14:30 - 15:45

Lab: Natural Legal Language Processing (II)

Oleksandra Klymenko, Daniel Braun

16:30 - 18:00 Poster session with get-together
(see below for more information)

Department of Informatics - Entrance area

(Number 2 on the map above; Boltzmannstr. 3)

 

Tuesday (03.08.2021)

Time Event Place
10:00 - 11:00

Lab: Tools for Legal Decision Modeling and Automation (I)

Aaron Rothmann, Finn Schädlich (Open Legal Tech, remote)
Charlotte Kufus, Torben Gerkensmeyer (LegaOS)

Institute for Advanced Study (IAS)

(Number 3 on the map above;Lichtenbergstr. 2 a)

11:00 - 11:15 Coffee break
11:15 - 12:00

Lab: Tools for Legal Decision Modeling and Automation (II)

12:00 - 13:00

Lunch break

Canteen (Mensa)

(Number 5 on the map above; Boltzmannstr. 19)

13:15 - 14:15

Computational Models of Case-Based Reasoning (I)

Prof. Kevin D. Ashley, PhD (University of Pittsburgh, remote)

This tutorial will explain how AI and Law research has represented legal cases computationally in order to model legal reasoning and argumentation. Initially, we will compare how cases are represented in three classic lines of work: the Taxman II, Hypo / CATO,  and GREBE programs. The tutorial will then introduce teleological legal reasoning and how various CBR models have addressed it. We will examine case-based methods of computationally predicting case outcomes and compare them with machine learning text-based prediction methods. Finally, we will compare which CBR models could connect directly with legal texts, how to make those connections, and why that might be a good idea. For example, the case-based models could help to explain or challenge text-based predictions.

Institute for Advanced Study (IAS)

(Number 3 on the map above;Lichtenbergstr. 2 a)

14:15 - 14:30

Coffee Break

14:30 - 16:00

Computational Models of Case-Based Reasoning (II)

Prof. Kevin D. Ashley, PhD (remote)

 

Wednesday (04.08.2021)

Time Event Place
09:00 - 10:15

Argument Mining (I)

Dr. Serena Villata (CNR - Centre national de la recherche scientifique, remote)

Argumentation mining aims at automatically extracting arguments from textual corpora, to provide structured data for computational models of argument and reasoning engines. It has recently become a hot topic also due to its potential in processing information from the Web (social media, online newspapers, product reviews, legal documents). In a typical argumentation mining pipeline, sentences recognized as argumentative are extracted from the input document, and argument components (claims and supporting evidences) are identified within such sentences. Then, links between argument components are predicted to construct complete arguments. Finally, the connections between arguments are inferred (e.g., support and attack relations), so as to produce a complete argument graph. Recent advances in computational linguistics and machine learning promise to enable breakthrough applications to this research area.

In this course, we will introduce argumentation models and methods, review existing systems and applications, and discuss challenges and perspectives of this new research area. More specifically, in the first part, we will focus on approaches and methods proposed to address the task of argument detection in text (and the subtasks of argumentative sentence detection and argument component boundary detection). In the second part, we will deal with approaches proposed to predict the structure of the arguments and the relations among them. Available corpora and existing applications will be described for each task with a focus on legal text and applications.

Institute for Advanced Study (IAS)

(Number 3 on the map above;Lichtenbergstr. 2 a)

10:15 - 10:30 Coffee break
10:30 - 11:45

Argument Mining (II)

Dr. Serena Villata 

 

12:00 - 13:00 Lunch break

Canteen (Mensa)

(Number 5 on the map above; Boltzmannstr. 19)

13:00 - 22:00 Networking in the Bavarian countryside

Starnberger See and Kloster Andechs

 

Thursday (05.08.2021)

Time Event Place
09:00 - 10:15

Prediction of Court Decisions (I)

Prof. Matthias Grabmair, PhD (TU Munich)

"The Case outcome and what to do with it?"

Information about the case outcome and judge votes has been the subject of much recent research at the intersection of Law, AI, NLP, and data analysis. This session will present an overview of prominent prior research using the case outcome signal to tackle tasks such as prediction, summarization, and judge modeling (including works about the US Supreme Court and the European Court of Human Rights). Selected issues will be examined in greater detail and lessons learned will be drawn.

Institute for Advanced Study (IAS)

(Number 3 on the map above;Lichtenbergstr. 2 a)

10:15 - 10:30 Coffee break
10:30 - 11:45

Prediction of Court Decisions (II)

Prof. Matthias Grabmair, PhD

12:00 - 13:00 Lunch break

Canteen (Mensa)

(Number 5 on the map above; Boltzmannstr. 19)

13:15 - 14:15

Fairness (I)

Prof. Dr. Isabel Valera (Saarland University, remote)

Institute for Advanced Study (IAS)

(Number 3 on the map above;Lichtenbergstr. 2 a)

14:15 - 14:30

Coffee Break

14:30 - 16:00

Fairness (II)

Prof. Dr. Isabel Valera (remote)

   
16:30 - 19:00 

Panel discussion: Law, AI, and Ethics

Moderator: Prof. Dr. Florian Matthes
Prof. Kevin D. Ashley, Prof. Dr. Frauke Kreuter (University of Maryland), Prof. Dr. Isabel Valera (all remote)

Afterwards: Get together

 

Friday (06.08.2021)

Time Event Place
10:00 - 11:00

Legal Tech and Legal Operations – An industry perspective on Legal Innovation (I)

Dr. Bernhard Waltl (Liquid Legal Institute)

Digitalization and digital transformation are ubiquitous in every area of the industry. The potential is huge – especially for the legal industry. Legal knowledge workers, such as lawyers, in-house counsel, paralegals, etc. can benefit from the advancements in the field of Legal Tech and Legal Operations. This presentation will share insights from an industrial perspective on the field. Based on selected use cases we will discuss the potential, but also the risks and challenges, which can prevent innovation in the legal field and how to overcome these.

Institute for Advanced Study (IAS)

(Number 3 on the map above;Lichtenbergstr. 2 a)

11:00 - 11:15 Coffee break
11:15 - 11:45

Legal Tech and Legal Operations – An industry perspective on Legal Innovation (II)

Dr. Bernhard Waltl

11:45 - 12:00

Closing remarks

Prof. Dr. Florian Matthes

12:00 - 13:00 Lunch

Canteen (Mensa)

(Number 5 on the map above; Boltzmannstr. 19)

 

Speakers

Prof. Dr. Florian Matthes

Since 2002 Florian Matthes holds the chair for Software Engineering for Business Information Systems at Technische Universität München. The current focus of his research is on technologies driving the digital transformation of enterprises and societies: Enterprise architecture management, service platforms and their ecosystems, semantic analysis of legal texts and executable contracts on blockchains. He is co-founder of CoreMedia, infoAsset and Tr8cy, scientific advisor of UnternehmerTUM, member of the Münchner Kreis, scientifc advisor of Noumena Digital, member of the advisory board of the Ernst Denert-Stiftung für Software Engineering, co-founder of Blockchain Bayern e.V. and initiator and organizer of international conferences and workshops in software and enterprise engineering.

Daniel Braun, M.Sc.

Daniel Braun is a research associate at the chair of Software Engineering for Business Information Systems (sebis) at the Technische Universität München since May 2016. He holds a master's degree in Computing Science from the University of Aberdeen, where he was a research student and scholar of the Friedrich Naumann Foundation supervised by Prof Ehud Reiter.

From 2010 to 2014 he worked as student research assistant in the Intelligent User Interfaces Department at the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence.

Oleksandra Klymenko, M.Sc. mult.

Oleksandra Klymenko joined the chair for Software Engineering of Business Information Systems at the Technical University of Munich in July 2019. Oleksandra holds a M.Sc. in Information Systems from the Technical University of Munich and a M.Sc. in Informatics from Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv.

Prof. Kevin D. Ashley, PhD

Professor Kevin D. Ashley is an expert on computer modeling of legal reasoning and cyberspace legal issues. In 2002 he was selected as a Fellow of the American Association of Artificial Intelligence “for significant contributions in computationally modeling case-based and analogical reasoning in law and practical ethics.” He has reported his research in conference proceedings of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence, the International Association for Artificial Intelligence and Law, and the Foundation for Legal Knowledge Systems (JURIX). He has also published in journals such as Jurimetrics, the International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education, and Artificial Intelligence and Law, of which he is a co-editor in chief. Professor Ashley has been a principal investigator of a number of National Science Foundation grants to study reasoning with cases in law and professional ethics.

Dr. Serena Villata

Dr. Serena Villata is a member of the SPARKS-WIMMICS Research Team and since October 2015, she is a researcher (CR1) at CNRS. She defended her HDR (habilitation) in July 2018 and is affiliated with the I3S research centre in Sophia Antipolis (France). Dr Villata's research interests include Artificial Intelligence, Knowledge Representation and Reasoning, Argumentation Mining, Artificial Intelligence and Law, Computational Linguistics, and Semantic Web.

Prof. Matthias Grabmair, Ph.D., LL.M.

Matthias Grabmair is a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Legal Tech in the Department of Informatics at the Technical University of Munich. Before joining TUM in January 2021, he worked as a Legal Data Scientist at the German legal informatics company SINC (2019-2020). Prior to that, he spent four years at Carnegie Mellon University's Language Technologies Institute working with Prof. Eric Nyberg as a Visiting Researcher, Postdoc, and Systems Scientist (2015-2019). He obtained a diploma in law from the University of Augsburg, Germany, as well as a Master of Laws (LL.M.) and Ph.D. in Intelligent Systems mentored by Prof. Kevin Ashley from the University of Pittsburgh.

Prof. Dr. Isabel Valera

Isabel Valera is a full Professor on Machine Learning at the Department of Computer Science of Saarland University in Saarbrücken (Germany), and Adjunct Faculty at MPI for Software Systems in Saarbrücken (Germany). She is a fellow of the European Laboratory for Learning and Intelligent Systems ( ELLIS), where she is part of the Robust Machine Learning Program and of the Saarbrücken Artificial Intelligence & Machine learning (Sam) Unit. Prior to this, she was an independent group leader at the MPI for Intelligent Systems in Tübingen (Germany) until the end of the year. I have held a German Humboldt Post-Doctoral Fellowship, and a “Minerva fast track” fellowship from the Max Planck Society. She obtained her PhD in 2014 and MSc degree in 2012 from the University Carlos III in Madrid (Spain), and worked as postdoctoral researcher at the MPI for Software Systems (Germany) and at the University of Cambridge (UK).

Prof. Dr. Frauke Kreuter

Professor Frauke Kreuter is Co-director of the Social Data Science Center (SoDa) and faculty member in the Joint Program in Survey Methodology (JPSM) at the University of Maryland, USA; Professor of Statistics and Data Science at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Germany and head of the statistical methods group at the Institute for Employment Research (IAB) in Nuremberg, Germany. She is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association and the 2020 recipient of the Warren Mitofsky Innovators Award of the American Association for Public Opinion Research. In addition to her academic work Dr. Kreuter is the Founder of the International Program for Survey and Data Science, developed in response to the increasing demand from researchers and practitioners for the appropriate methods and right tools to face a changing data environment; Co-Founder of the Coleridge Initiative, whose goal is to accelerate data-driven research and policy around human beings and their interactions for program management, policy development, and scholarly purposes by enabling efficient, effective, and secure access to sensitive data about society and the economy; and Co-Founder of the German language podcast Dig Deep.

Dr. Bernhard Waltl

Bernhard Waltl is a computer scientist and did his PhD with a specialization on Natural Language Processing for legal documents. He works at BMW Group as Legal Operations Officer. In 2017, he co-founded the Liquid Legal Institute e. V. (www.liquid-legal-institute.org) which focusses on practical challenges of Legal Innovation and the digital transformation of the legal business. He is a member of the Economic Advisory Council of the German Informatics Society (https://gi.de/giwi/).

 

Poster Session

Poster sessions are a common format in Computer Science, but less so in the legal domain. The goal of a poster session is to give a large number of people the opportunity to present their work in a short timespan. The poster session will consist of three rounds of 20 minutes each. In each round, ten participants will present their poster and the other participants get the chance to look at their posters and talk to them. We will try to have a truely hybrid poster session by using tablets as tools for virtual presence. If you present your poster from home, a tablet will be placed in front of your poster. You will receive a Zoom link to connect to the tablet and present your poster to the participants in Munich and answer their questions. If you're not presenting your own poster, you can join another Zoom roo for a virtual tour, in which we go from poster to poster so that you get the chance to see other peoples poster and ask question. 

 

Food

From Monday to Friday, you are offered breakfast in the hotel and lunch in the canteen of TUM, both meals are paid by the summer school. In the coffee break, we will serve coffee, water and sweets. We will not provide dinner. There are multiple restaurant in Garching, which are just a short walk or one stop with the subway away. If you are looking for traditional Bavarian food (and beer), we suggest Garchinger Augustiner. You can also find decent Greek and Italian food in Garching.

 

Reimbursement of Travel Expenses

Travel expenses can only be reimbursed after the event and only within the limits previously communicated to you. Please make sure to keep all bills, because only expenses for which you can provide original bills can be reimbursed.

 

The 1st Munich Legal Tech Summer School is funded by the Volkswagen Stiftung